Another illustration (by visual artists Rob Ryan) featured in one of our back issues: ‘The Reach-Out-and-Touch’ Issue, guest-edited by Paul Priestman.
Rob Ryan was born in 1962 in Akrotiri, Cyprus. He studied Fine Art at Trent Polytechnic and at the Royal College of Art in London where he specialised in Printmaking.
Although he views himself first and always as a fine artist, his intricate papercut work adapts itself readily to many other mediums including ceramics, textiles, homewares and even jewellery.
Over the years, he has collaborated with the likes of Paul Smith, Liberty of London, Tatty Devine and Vogue.
His work often consists of whimsical figures paired with sentimental, grave, honest and occasionally humorous pieces of writing which he admits are autobiographical.
Rob has exhibited widely across the UK and internationally and has written and illustrated three books, ‘This Is For You’, ‘A Sky Full Of Kindness’ and most recently ‘The Invisible Kingdom’. He lives and works in London, UK. Make sure to check out Ryan’s work here. 
Also, please visit our interactive magazine for more back issues and art work (which can be bought in our shop). CHECK IT OUT!

Another illustration (by visual artists Rob Ryan) featured in one of our back issues: ‘The Reach-Out-and-Touch’ Issue, guest-edited by Paul Priestman.

Rob Ryan was born in 1962 in Akrotiri, Cyprus. He studied Fine Art at Trent Polytechnic and at the Royal College of Art in London where he specialised in Printmaking.

Although he views himself first and always as a fine artist, his intricate papercut work adapts itself readily to many other mediums including ceramics, textiles, homewares and even jewellery.

Over the years, he has collaborated with the likes of Paul Smith, Liberty of London, Tatty Devine and Vogue.

His work often consists of whimsical figures paired with sentimental, grave, honest and occasionally humorous pieces of writing which he admits are autobiographical.

Rob has exhibited widely across the UK and internationally and has written and illustrated three books, ‘This Is For You’, ‘A Sky Full Of Kindness’ and most recently ‘The Invisible Kingdom’. He lives and works in London, UK. Make sure to check out Ryan’s work here

Also, please visit our interactive magazine for more back issues and art work (which can be bought in our shop). CHECK IT OUT!

Set of illustrations by Sandra Howgate - featured in the ‘Making-Sense-of-Nonsense’ Issue, guest edited by Tony Davidson.

‘Making Sense of Nonsense’ is the title of the Tony Davidson issue, guest editor and creative director of the London branch of Wieden+Kennedy, a renowned advertising agency. With .Cent running very little advertising, making a person so linked to this medium a guest editor may seem like nonsense – after meeting with Tony, the idea of “Making Sense of Nonsense” issue was born. Featuring work of Jim Riswold, Peter Jensen, Mr Oizo and Minnie Weisz to name a few, this issue is about jumping into unfamiliar territory and embracing the chaos to find creative solutions to problems we encounter.

Please visit our shop/gallery to buy back issues and limited prints.

Illustration by graphic designer Imogen Bellotti for the ‘Making-Sense-of-Nonsense’ Issue, guest-edited by Tony Davidson.
Imogen has art directed four issues of .Cent: The Fundamental Love Issue, The Spaces Inbetween Issue and The Contradictions Issue. Since then, she has worked at Vice Magazine. She works at i-D now.
Visit our shop/gallery for more illustration/back issues here. 

Illustration by graphic designer Imogen Bellotti for the ‘Making-Sense-of-Nonsense’ Issue, guest-edited by Tony Davidson.

Imogen has art directed four issues of .Cent: The Fundamental Love Issue, The Spaces Inbetween Issue and The Contradictions Issue. Since then, she has worked at Vice Magazine. She works at i-D now.

Visit our shop/gallery for more illustration/back issues here

Set of illustrations by Greyworld - a group of artists who create urban artworks. Their illustrations were featured in The ‘Making-Sense-of-Nonsense’ Issue, guest-edited by Tony Davidson.

‘Making Sense of Nonsense’ is the title of the Tony Davidson issue, guest editor and creative director of the London branch of Wieden+Kennedy, a renowned advertising agency. With Cent running very little advertising, making a person so linked to this medium a guest editor may seem like nonsense – after meeting with Tony, the idea of “Making Sense of Nonsense” issue was born. Featuring work of Jim Riswold, Peter Jensen, Mr Oizo and Minnie Weisz to name a few, this issue is about jumping into unfamiliar territory and embracing the chaos to find creative solutions to problems we encounter.

Again: Pomme Chan for .Cent’s ‘Making Sense of Nonsense’ Issue, guest-edited Tony Davidson.

‘Making Sense of Nonsense’ is the title of the Tony Davidson issue, guest editor and creative director of the London branch of Wieden+Kennedy, a renowned advertising agency. With Cent running very little advertising, making a person so linked to this medium a guest editor may seem like nonsense – after meeting with Tony, the idea of “Making Sense of Nonsense” issue was born. Featuring work of Jim Riswold, Peter Jensen, Mr Oizo and Minnie Weisz to name a few, this issue is about jumping into unfamiliar territory and embracing the chaos to find creative solutions to problems we encounter.

Visit our shop to this and many more back issues. 

Illustration by James Hamilton-Butler for The Ornament Issue, guest edited by Basso&Brooke.
Basso & Brooke is a fashion label formed by Bruno Basso and Christopher Brooke. After meeting in 2001, they produced their first collection in 2004, and were the inaugural winners of Fashion Fringe, a UK talent competition to search out for the next big thing in fashion. The label is largely revered for their pioneering use of the digital print technique within the fashion industry. Tim Blanks of Style.com described them as the Pixar of clothes. They have also been described as “the masters of fantastical digital print.” 
Since then, they have launched numerous ready-to-wear collections from 2005–present.
In 2006, The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan museum of art in New York acquired the Swarovski crystal-covered finale piece of their Fall-Winter 2005 collection.

In May 2009, Michelle Obama wore a piece from their SS09 collection at an informal evening of Poetry, Music and the Spoken Word within the White House.
Visit their page here and also have a look in our online shop for more back issues and illustrations. 

Illustration by James Hamilton-Butler for The Ornament Issue, guest edited by Basso&Brooke.

Basso & Brooke is a fashion label formed by Bruno Basso and Christopher Brooke. After meeting in 2001, they produced their first collection in 2004, and were the inaugural winners of Fashion Fringe, a UK talent competition to search out for the next big thing in fashion. The label is largely revered for their pioneering use of the digital print technique within the fashion industry. Tim Blanks of Style.com described them as the Pixar of clothes. They have also been described as “the masters of fantastical digital print.” 

Since then, they have launched numerous ready-to-wear collections from 2005–present.

In 2006, The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan museum of art in New York acquired the Swarovski crystal-covered finale piece of their Fall-Winter 2005 collection.

In May 2009, Michelle Obama wore a piece from their SS09 collection at an informal evening of Poetry, Music and the Spoken Word within the White House.

Visit their page here and also have a look in our online shop for more back issues and illustrations.